youth corner

TEN TIPS FOR PREVENTION FOR YOUTH

As a young person you are faced with many challenges.  However, very few have the potential to affect your life in a more significant way than the decisions you make about alcohol and drugs.  The decisions you make about alcohol and drugs will influence your health, your grades, your relationships, your job or career, maybe even your freedom.

So, what can you do to protect yourself and reduce the risk of alcohol and drug problems? 

Here are Ten Tips for Prevention--Youth:

Don’t Be Afraid to Say No:  Sometimes, our fear of negative reaction from our friends, or others we don’t even know, keeps us from doing what we know is right.  Real simple, it may seem like “everyone is doing it,” but they are not.  Don’t let someone else make your decisions for you.  If someone is pressuring you to do something that's not right for you, you have the right to say no, the right not to give a reason why, and the right to just walk away.
Connect With Your Friends and Avoid Negative Peer Pressure:  Pay attention to who you are hanging out with.  If you are hanging out with a group in which the majority of kids are drinking alcohol or using drugs to get high, you may want to think about making some new friends.  You may be headed toward an alcohol and drug problem if you continue to hang around others who routinely drink alcohol, smoke marijuana, abuse prescription drugs or use illegal drugs.  You don't have to go along to get along.
Make Connections With Your Parents or Other Adults:  As you grow up, having people you can rely on, people you can talk to about life, life’s challenges and your decisions about alcohol and drugs is very important.  The opportunity to benefit from someone else’s life experiences can help put things in perspective and can be invaluable.
Enjoy Life and Do What You Love -  Don’t Add Alcohol and Drugs:  Learn how to enjoy life and the people in your life, without adding alcohol or drugs.  Alcohol and drugs can change who you are, limit your potential and complicate your life.  Too often, “I’m bored” is just an excuse.  Get out and get active in school and community activities such as music, sports, arts or a part-time job.  Giving back as a volunteer is a great way to gain perspective on life.
Follow the Family Rules About Alcohol and Drugs:  As you grow up and want to assume more control over your life, having the trust and respect of your parents is very important.  Don’t let alcohol and drugs come between you and your parents.  Talking with mom and dad about alcohol and drugs can be very helpful.
Get Educated About Alcohol and Drugs:  You cannot rely on the myths and misconceptions that are out there among your friends and on the internet.  Your ability to make the right decisions includes getting educated.  Visit Learn About Alcohol and Learn About Drugs.  And, as you learn, share what you are learning with your friends and your family.
Be a Role Model and Set a Positive Example:  Don’t forget, what you do is more important than what you say!  You are setting the foundation and direction for your life; where are you headed?
Plan Ahead:  As you make plans for the party or going out with friends you need to plan ahead.  You need to protect yourself and be smart.  Don’t become a victim of someone else’s alcohol or drug use.  Make sure that there is someone you can call, day or night, no matter what, if you need them.  And, do the same for your friends.
Speak Out/Speak Up/Take Control:  Take responsibility for your life, your health and your safety.  Speak up about what alcohol and drugs are doing to your friends, your community and encourage others to do the same.
Get help!:  If you or someone you know is in trouble with alcohol or drugs, get help. Don’t wait. You don't have to be alone.

Credit: ncadd.org

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10 Reasons Why College Students Should Vote

10 Reasons Why College Students Should Vote

1. It's your right.
Just as you've been told since elementary school, voting is an important right we have a duty to exercise. Many governments around the world allow citizens no part in electing officials. You do have the opportunity to help select government leaders, and the health of our democracy relies on your participation

2. Your vote matters.
Many students don't believe their vote will make any difference, but recent history has shown that elections can be decided by a handful of votes. In fact, many local contests end in ties each election year with winners being determined by a coin flip. Taking the initiative to vote can help prevent elections from being left to chance.

3. Shape the social agenda.
Are you passionate about a particular social issue? Gay marriage, capital punishment and the separation of church and state are only a few of many contentious topics that dominate the political discourse. Learn about candidates' views on issues that are important to you, and vote in support of your beliefs.

4. Economic policies will affect your future.
Most expect social security benefits to be gone or greatly diminished by the time college-aged individuals reach retirement age - which will be higher than it is now. Politicians continually make decisions about higher ed costs and student loan policies. These and other issues prove you have an important economic interest in every election.

5. Help shape foreign policy.
National leaders in Washington, D.C., are continually making foreign policy decisions, including when to intervene militarily in world affairs. It isn't the president or Congressional members who deploy to other countries to risk their lives - it's young people. Use your vote to support foreign policies you believe in.

6. Have your say on environmental issues.
The environment stands to be among the biggest political topics of this generation. Many climate experts warn of serious, potentially irreversible weather changes that may drastically alter life on our planet. Whether you agree with this assessment or have other views, your vote is a way to express your convictions.

7. You're part of an important voting bloc.
The college vote can swing elections. There are more than 75 million Millennials, a number that rivals the number of baby boomers - another important voting bloc. The problem is that college students typically vote in much smaller numbers than older citizens. Mobilized, Millennials represent a powerful political force.

8. Politicians won't address student needs without student votes.
Politicians know who votes each election, and they are more likely to support initiatives that are popular among groups with the highest voter turnout. For college students to have significant political influence, they must turn out in greater numbers than is traditionally seen. You have a part to play in that.

9. Demonstrate concern for the next generation.
By voting you are not only doing your part to influence the present, you are also affecting the future. Demonstrating this point well is the fact that the president selects U.S. Supreme Court Justices for lifetime appointments. These judicial officials may exert powerful influence for decades to come.

10. Honor past sacrifices.
Voting is a way to honor those who have helped to secure our rights. Military members who have fought for this country, suffrage activists and Civil Rights leaders are only a few examples of those to whom we owe our respect and appreciation. Voting gives you the opportunity to help pay that debt.


http://study.com/articles

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Six Qualities that Make You a Good Mentor for Youth

Most studies have focused more on the effects of mentorship on youth and less on what adults actually do in their role as mentors.  But in my interviews with more than 40 young people who were mentored by adults, some common and important themes emerged. Young people agreed that you are more likely to influence their life path if you possess the following six qualities:

 
1. You are Supportive

By far, the most important role of a mentor is to support and encourage young people, particularly as they struggle to overcome obstacles and solve problems. When young people feel down, upset with their families, or unhappy in their life situations, mentors are beside them, letting them talk about anything and reminding them of their innate value.

2. You are an Active Listener

Mentors listen first and speak last.  Many teens mentioned how little they feel listened to by most adults. Often, they feel inferior even when they have good ideas. But mentors are different. They always listen, even when they are not obligated to do so.

3. You Push -- Just Enough

As parents can attest, most teens don’t respond well to being pushed out of their comfort zones, particularly within families. But teens really like to have high expectations set for them – both academically and personally. They appreciate when mentors push them beyond what they may have imagined they could accomplish. In fact, this is likely the reason why mentored youth from disadvantaged backgrounds are twice as likely to attend college.   

4. You Have Authentic Interest in Youth as Individual

Teens can tell the difference between adults who are authentically interested in them as individuals and those who are just playing a role. Mentors engage youth to understand all aspects of their lives and interests. They value young people’s ideas and honor their changing feelings and moods.

5. You Foster Self Decision-Making

Good mentors don’t judge young people or impose their own beliefs on them. Instead they remind teens who they are and help them believe they have the insights to make good choices. Knowing they are not being judged helps young people think through decisions critically, sifting through the deeper values that will inform the adults they become.

6. You Lend Perspective

Adult mentors provide perspective to young people from their additional years of life experience. When obstacles seem overwhelming, mentors help put those challenges in perspective. They also help young people see both sides of a situation, helping model theskills of positive skepticism.

What other qualities make good mentors for young people? How can we provide mentoring relationships to all teens? Please share your insights and experiences.

Author

Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD, is the author of Tomorrow’s Change Makers: Reclaiming the Power of Citizenship for a New Generation. A developmental psychologist and researcher, she works at the intersection of positive youth development and education.

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Atlanta teen"s "White Privilege" poem goes viral

ATLANTA -- Since the violence that shook America last week, a poem written and performed by an Atlanta teenager this past spring has been getting new attention. In fact, it has gone viral.

"White Boy Privilege" was an entry in a school poetry contest.

"To be honest I am scared of what it would be like if i wasn't on the top rung, if the tables were turned, and I didn't have my white boy privilege safety blankie to protect me," Royce Mann recited at the poetry contest.

Mann's message was a plea from a 14-year-old white male going to a private school in Atlanta: let everyone share his privileges.

"I love it because when I see a police officer, I see someone who's on my side," he recited.

Mann told CBS News he is just trying to be truthful.

"And that I wouldn't trade places with anyone," he said. "Because I think a lot of people aren't truthful about that."

Racial divisions seared America last week. After Minnesota and Baton Rouge, Mann's poem struck a nerve online.

Many loved it. Others attacked him.

More than eight million people have seen it.

"Everyone should have the privileges that I have," Mann recited. "Everyone's story should be written so all they have to do is get it read... I get that change can be scary but equality shouldn't be..."

Mann said he is not asking anyone to give up their dreams.

"I am not asking anyone to give up their quality," he said. "When you see something that is wrong, that is discrimination, speak up."

He finished his poem with talking about fear.

"It's time to let go of that fear," he recited. "It's time to take that ladder and turn it into a bridge."

Mann won that poetry contest.

CBS news

Watch video:   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnmo4Jl1OM0

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Job Interview Etiquette for Teenagers - How to Get a Job

So you want to get a job, huh?  Maybe you’re saving up for your first car, you want to contribute towards your college fund, or perhaps you just want to upgrade your phone to the latest iPhone?  Either way, you’re going to need money to do those things, and to have money, you usually have to get a job first. 

Now, your goal shouldn’t be just to find a job, it should be to find a job and to keep that job.  In order to keep your job, you are going to have to follow certain social protocols so that your employer not only respects you, but values you as a member of their team.  These are the same social rules that will usually land you the job in the first place.  So, if you’re looking for a job, follow the rules listed below as you head out to your job interviews so that you can make a good first impression.

It all starts with your application.  When you go into the place of employment to ask for an application, be sure that you are dressed appropriately.  Now, you don’t have to be all “suit & tie” when you ask for the application, but you might not want to go in with your stinky basketball uniform on, or your swim suit.  Ask for the application with an appropriate outfit on, that won’t make them target you as “unemployable”.  Also, no matter who gives you the application - be nice to them. You never know, the manger might be working behind the counter.  Also, you also don’t know exactly who you will be interviewing with, so you don’t want to rub someone the wrong way from the start by being rude when you ask for the application.  Put your nice face on and your nice clothes and go in there to get that application #likeaboss.  Be sure to fill it out as neat as possible too.  You want all of your contact information to be legible so you will be one of the first people they call for an interview.

Dress appropriately for the interview.  A good rule of thumb is that you will want to dress up, instead of wearing your everyday clothes.  Depending on the job that you are interviewing for, you might dress like you are going to church.  Guys may wear a nice collared shirt, button down shirt, slacks, and for professional jobs, you should wear a suit and tie.  Ladies should wear a nice blouse, a skirt, a dress, or some nice slacks with a button down shirt.  Please do not wear jeans, flip flops, beach attire, or shorts to your interview. 
Arrive to the interview 15 minutes early.  This will show the employer that you are responsible, and eager to speak with them.  Of course, after you get the job, you will want to continue arriving either early or on time so that you can maintain your employment status.  Employers hate when their employees are consistently late.  Don’t let that be the reason they let you go.  
At the interview, greet everyone with a firm handshake, make eye contact, and smile. This will show that you are confident and ready to work!
While in the interview, be sure to sit up straight. Don’t slouch, or lean back in your chair.   Answer the interview questions honestly, and give examples of your positive traits.  Don’t answer any question with a simple “yes” or “no”.  Tell them why you are the best candidate for the position that you are interviewing for.  For example, if they ask you “Do you have any work experience?” Say either “yes” or “no” and then explain the experience that you have.  If you don’t have any work experience, then explain the types of experiences that you do have like volunteering, participating on a team, babysitting, etc.   Also, refrain from talking about anything controversial during the interview like politics, religion, and stories of bad gossip.  Keep the conversation light and highlight your strengths so that the employer knows how you can benefit their company.
At the end of the interview, be sure to ask for the interviewer’s business card, and then shake their hand before you leave.  After the interview, be sure to send a quick “thank you” email thanking the employer for their time and their consideration.  This is a nice gesture and will usually earn you some cool points because it shows that you are considerate.
Then, wait patiently.  If you don’t hear from the employer within two weeks, contact them to see if they have made their hiring decision, and also express that you are still interested. 

Good luck on your job search! 

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Create an Academic Resumé for College Admissions and Scholarships

Applying to college can be an exciting time. It’s a time in your life when you are able to move across the country (or across the world) if you choose.  It’s also the season of your life where you are able to hone in on your particular interests while discovering your passions and choosing the courses of your choice.  There is so much adventure and education awaiting you when you go to college, but….you have to be admitted to college first. 

Now-a-days colleges are no longer just looking for smart students with high GPA’s.  Instead, colleges want to admit smart and well-rounded students who can prove that they will not only pay attention to their course of study, but who are involved in things outside of their regular school day.

When applying to college, or when applying for a scholarship, you may be asked to submit an Academic Resumé along with your application.  This resumé is extremely important and can sometimes make or break your college admission chances or your odds of receiving that scholarship, so it’s important to create an Academic Resumé that positively reflects who you are, what you stand for, and helps you to stand out above the rest.

There are a few key things that you will want to include on your Academic Resumé.  Read below to find how out to craft your perfect resume that will help you get admitted to your dream college or to gain the scholarship that you’ve always wanted.   

1.  Contact Information
Start your Academic Resumé with a nice header that tells the readers how they can contact you.  Be sure to include your name (nick names are not appropriate), your mailing address, phone number, and the best email address where they can reach you.  Make sure that your email address is professional and includes some reference to your first and last name.  Email addresses like “hotgirl786@gmail.com” and "skaterdude45@yahoo.com" might not send the positive impression that you want to send to the readers, so avoid these types of email addresses and instead create something simple with your first and last name.   

Here is an example of how to list your contact information on your resumé:

Michelle Scott

1234 Walnut Drive #789

Hometown, TX 76202

michelle.scott@gmail.com

(555) 555-1458

2.  Education
In the education section, be sure to include information about your current school, what grade you are in, your current GPA, your class rank, and your expected graduation date. 

Type it in the following format:

EDUCATION

Student at Cooltown High School
Graduation date: May 2019
Current GPA: 3.85 - Top 10% of class
3.  Work Experience
The next section is where you list your work experience.  Your work experience should include any jobs that you have had while in high school.  Be sure to specifically list your title, you duties and responsibilities while at that job, the dates you held that position, and any honors or awards that you received while on the job.   If you don’t have any official work experience, think about other things that could count as work experience for you such as babysitting, dog walking, gardening, etc.  If you did those things for a significant period of time, count them as your work experience and add them to your resumé.  Start with your most recent job first and then work your way backwards.

Here is an example of how you can list your work experience:

WORK EXPERIENCE

Sales Associate, Office Depot, June 2014 – Present

Maintain and restock inventory.
Provide customer service.
Operate computerized cash register system.
Child Care, Cynthia’s Daycare, August 2012 – June 2014

Provided child care for several families after school, weekends and during school vacations.

1) Simply enter their name. 2) View the military record online!
4.  Extracurricular Activities
The next section is for extracurricular activities.  Spotlight all of the amazing clubs and organizations that you are involved in in this section.  These can be clubs and activities that you participate in both in school and outside of school.  Here is an example of how they can be listed:

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

Marching Band, Clarinet  – Fall 2009-Present
Baking Club – Spring 2010-Present
Theater Club – Fall 2013- Spring 2014
Soccer Team, Captain  – Fall 2014- Present
5.  Honors and Awards
In this section, feel free to brag.  This is your time to list all of the honors and awards that you have received while in high school.  Jog your memory to be sure that you don’t leave anything out, and also include the dates associated with the honor or award.  List it on your resumé like below:

HONORS AND AWARDS

National Honor Society: 2012, 2013, 2014
Academic Honor Roll: 2012 - Present  
2015 Best Drug Prevention Week Poster Designer winner
President of high school chapter of Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), 2014 – present
Secretary of National Honor Society, 2015 – present

6.  Volunteer and Community Service
The final section of the Academic Resumé is where you include information about your volunteer and community service experience.  College admission representatives and scholarship committees love to award students who have served the community.  So, take some time to list all of the ways that you have given back.  Here is a sample of how it can be listed:

VOLUNTEER & COMMUNITY EXPERIENCE

Plano Public Library, Library Aide — Summer 2012 - Summer 2014
American Red Cross, Relief Volunteer  — Spring 2015
Dallas Presbyterian Church, Choir Member — Fall 2013 – Present
Big Brother & Big Sisters, Mentor — Fall 2015- Present
 

That’s it!  Spell check and then your Academic Resumé is ready to be sent out to colleges and scholarship committees everywhere.  Good luck! 
Related
College Preparation Checklist for Middle School Teens
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What You Can Do About Inequality on Campus

College and university campuses are often seen as bastions of progressive perspectives. Inequality and bigoted views, however, persist at U.S. postsecondary institutions. Learn what students can do to confront prejudice and discrimination on campus.

1. Become familiar with university policies and applicable laws.
Most colleges have policies that explicitly prohibit discrimination and harassment on the basis of gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability or religion. These provisions are in addition to state and federal laws that offer protections. Know the rights you and campus peers have so that you can stand up for them.

2. Speak out against bigoted views and actions.
Whether it is you or another person who is the victim of discrimination or harassment, voice your opposition to the behavior. Letting bigoted comments or actions go without remark is tacit approval of them. Speaking out, on the other hand, can help make the campus more accepting and fair for all people.

3. Document any abuses you observe.
If you or another person are harassed or discriminated against, record what has happened. Documentation can be especially important when bringing claims of harassment or discrimination against a peer or faculty member. Note details about the abuse, when it happened and the names of those who witnessed it.

4. Consider reporting offenses to college officials.
Your decision on whether to report an incident of mistreatment will likely depend upon the nature of the event. While sternly rebuking an offending individual may be adequate in some circumstances, more serious incidents should be referred to university officials for further investigation.

5. File a complaint in response to university inaction.
If you file a report of harassment or discrimination and your college fails to follow up on it, you should consider filing a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. This government body can confront campus injustices that are left unaddressed by a college administration.

6. Consider filing a lawsuit.
If you are the victim of harassment or discrimination, you may wish to file a lawsuit against your school. Colleges are responsible for providing a safe environment where all people have equal opportunity to succeed. If an institution fails to provide such an atmosphere, it may be legally culpable for an incident.

7. Contact the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).
The ACLU aims to protect the civil rights of U.S. citizens. The organization can be one place to turn if you don't feel incidents of campus discrimination or harassment have been adequately addressed. The ACLU is often a co-complainant on lawsuits filed by individuals who have experienced mistreatment.

8. Identify yourself as an ally.
Make it known that you support groups of people who are routinely harassed or otherwise mistreated on college campuses. Be open and vocal with friends and acquaintances about your disapproval of discrimination and prejudice based on race, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion or disability.

9. Become a campus activist.
Find a way to actively address bigotry on campus. Participate in a Day of Silence to raise awareness about discrimination against those who identify as GLBTQ. Participate in Take Back the Night events to protest sexual violence. Organize a teach-in about institutional racism. There are countless ways to make your mark.

10. Utilize campus resources.
Tap into available resources at your institution that can be useful in your activism. Many schools, for instance, have student clubs devoted to ending racism, sexual violence, homophobia and other forms of prejudice and discrimination. Join with other students at your school to make the greatest positive impact on campus.

http://study.com/articles

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10 Reasons Why College Students Should Vote

10 Reasons Why College Students Should Vote

1. It's your right.
Just as you've been told since elementary school, voting is an important right we have a duty to exercise. Many governments around the world allow citizens no part in electing officials. You do have the opportunity to help select government leaders, and the health of our democracy relies on your participation

2. Your vote matters.
Many students don't believe their vote will make any difference, but recent history has shown that elections can be decided by a handful of votes. In fact, many local contests end in ties each election year with winners being determined by a coin flip. Taking the initiative to vote can help prevent elections from being left to chance.

3. Shape the social agenda.
Are you passionate about a particular social issue? Gay marriage, capital punishment and the separation of church and state are only a few of many contentious topics that dominate the political discourse. Learn about candidates' views on issues that are important to you, and vote in support of your beliefs.

4. Economic policies will affect your future.
Most expect social security benefits to be gone or greatly diminished by the time college-aged individuals reach retirement age - which will be higher than it is now. Politicians continually make decisions about higher ed costs and student loan policies. These and other issues prove you have an important economic interest in every election.

5. Help shape foreign policy.
National leaders in Washington, D.C., are continually making foreign policy decisions, including when to intervene militarily in world affairs. It isn't the president or Congressional members who deploy to other countries to risk their lives - it's young people. Use your vote to support foreign policies you believe in.

6. Have your say on environmental issues.
The environment stands to be among the biggest political topics of this generation. Many climate experts warn of serious, potentially irreversible weather changes that may drastically alter life on our planet. Whether you agree with this assessment or have other views, your vote is a way to express your convictions.

7. You're part of an important voting bloc.
The college vote can swing elections. There are more than 75 million Millennials, a number that rivals the number of baby boomers - another important voting bloc. The problem is that college students typically vote in much smaller numbers than older citizens. Mobilized, Millennials represent a powerful political force.

8. Politicians won't address student needs without student votes.
Politicians know who votes each election, and they are more likely to support initiatives that are popular among groups with the highest voter turnout. For college students to have significant political influence, they must turn out in greater numbers than is traditionally seen. You have a part to play in that.

9. Demonstrate concern for the next generation.
By voting you are not only doing your part to influence the present, you are also affecting the future. Demonstrating this point well is the fact that the president selects U.S. Supreme Court Justices for lifetime appointments. These judicial officials may exert powerful influence for decades to come.

10. Honor past sacrifices.
Voting is a way to honor those who have helped to secure our rights. Military members who have fought for this country, suffrage activists and Civil Rights leaders are only a few examples of those to whom we owe our respect and appreciation. Voting gives you the opportunity to help pay that debt.


http://study.com/articles

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Student Protesters: Then and Now

College students played a significant role in Wisconsin protests over scaled-back labor-union rights. And Egypt's recent political transformation would not have been possible without the support of students in that country. Learn how events like these fit within the history and heritage of student activism.

Influencing History
There is a rich history of social activism on campuses across the United States and around the world. While select aspects of its roots extend back to before 1950, the student protest movement really crystallized in the second half of the 20th century. It was during this time that students began to get more politically active and mobilize in larger numbers.

In the United States, young people began to conceptualize colleges as prospective agents for social change in the 1960s. One of the first major groups to emerge was the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), a collective of individuals championing civil rights, anti-war policies and free speech. The SDS and other groups carried out widespread student strikes and campus protests that effectively shut down universities. These events ultimately became extremely heated and often resulted in violent clashes with authorities, epitomized by the Kent State shootings in 1970.

It was not only in the United States that violence marred student protests. In the U.K., progressive students of the New Left, aligned with the anti-war movement, routinely were exposed to police clubbings during rallies. And perhaps the most contentious - and iconic - event from student protest history occurred in May of 1968 on the streets of Paris and other French cities. Joined by striking workers, students occupied buildings and combated police for two weeks while calling for the dismantling of Western capitalism and authoritarianism. Inspired by French students, protests quickly followed in other countries across Europe and around the world.

A Powerful Legacy
Student protests may have been at their most active in the 1960s and 1970s, but that doesn't mean a lot of compelling events haven't occurred in the intervening years. Anyone who has seen images of the Tiananmen Square massacre - which occurred in Beijing, China, in 1989 - knows the length to which students will endanger themselves for a cause. In this case, young people and workers protested against the communist government for seven weeks before soldiers took the area with tanks. In all, somewhere between several hundred and several thousand people were killed.

Similar grit and determination has been shown by other students looking for government reform. Protesting Serbian students bore the blows of police batons while protesting in the country's major cities after widespread election fraud in 1996. In Iran, many students met an even worse fate amidst six days of protest in 1999. Rallies following raids on a student dorm in which a person was killed were put down by government officials, but only after additional student deaths and imprisonings. More recently in Iran, the 2009 Green Revolution directed against President Ahmadinejad's reelection was also infused with students.

Students continue to protest today. Many significant resistance events have occurred in the past year, including rallies in the U.S., the U.K. and Italy mobilized against cuts to education. Young people who are now in school stand to accumulate a greater financial burden if cuts to higher ed go through. In some cases, tuition and fee increases are likely to be catastrophic enough so as to price select students out of postsecondary education. To address this issue and others, committed groups of students are sure to continue raising their voices in protest.


http://study.com/articles

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Top Five Reasons Every Teen Should Volunteer

A young man by the name of Spencer Corwin was about to begin his 7th grade year in school. He wanted to volunteer in Orange County, California, but didn’t know where to get started. He found a lot of organizations for teen girls to get involved in the community, but he couldn’t find much out there for boys. So he decided to change that.

Spencer and his mother, Terry Corwin, recognized the importance of giving back, so they worked together to create Lion’s Heart. Lion’s Heart offers teenagers a special connection with their communities by providing volunteer and leadership opportunities for teens. Teen volunteers gain a lot from their experiences as they learn, grow, and mature. Lion’s Heart is dedicated to organizing, inspiring, and empowering teens to serve the community in fun and meaningful ways while promoting leadership, accountability, and teamwork.

We’ve all been taught that giving back is important, and some schools even require students to volunteer before graduating. But why should your teens want to volunteer?

Here are 5 benefits of volunteering (believe me, there are more).

You get to help those who need it. This is the obvious benefit, right? But it’s also the most important part. As a volunteer, you have a great opportunity to give back in any area that is important to you. For Spencer, making sure that all teens had the opportunity to volunteer was most important to him, so he started a volunteering organization. What passion could you pass on to others?

Volunteering is great for your mental and even physical health. Not only does volunteering boost self-confidence and happiness, but it has also been found that people who volunteer have lower mortality rates than those who don’t.

Volunteering can teach you the social and networking skills that you will need as an adult. Volunteering can teach teens how to network and build a list of important contacts. The people you volunteer with are also great candidates for recommendation letters. These are the people who have seen how you interact with others in social situations and how you handle new challenges.

Volunteering lets you see how others experience the world and opens your eyes to something new. From volunteering with animals to giving food at animal shelters, volunteering can expose you to very new experiences that you may not have known otherwise. Having new experiences can help you discover a new passion, and gives you the contacts to pursue that passion.

Make your resume shine. Volunteer experience can set you apart from other applicants for job and school applications. Your volunteer experience shows that you are ambitious, that you care about your community, and that you are willing to work to affect change. These are great qualities that recruiters and admissions officers look for in a potential student or employee.
So how can you get started volunteering? Join Lion’s Heart! We make it easy to get involved!

Lion’s Heart has worked with volunteer organizations like the Pediatric Cancer Research Foundation, Habitat for Humanity, The Rotary, Boys Town, Orange County Food Bank, National Beach Clean Up - Surfrider Foundation, numerous school districts, Tournament of Roses Parade, and American Red Cross blood drives, to name just a few.

We are not a fundraising organization, and we rely on our many volunteers. All of our volunteers are enthusiastic about serving the community, and teens can be involved with or without parent participation. It couldn’t be any easier to make a difference!


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